Without the Federal Government, Who Will Regulate Dog Meat?

By: Ryan McMaken
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The federal government is running a massive deficit right now. American wages are stagnant. The US is involved in multiple costly wars with no apparent objective. And the president raises taxes on Americans at will through his tariff policy.

But fortunately the Congress is getting down to what is really important. Federalizing laws banning the sale of cat and dog meat.

The silliness of Congress’s involvement in the matter is so obvious that even CBS news begins its article on the topic with a snide comment:

The government shuts down at the end of the month, and Democrats and Republicans seem unable to make a deal to keep it open. They are, however, united in trying to stop people from eating pets.

But the new bill does provide a chance for politicians to crow about “accomplishing” something in Congress. Bill sponsor and Florida Democrat Alice Hastings released a glowing statement:

“The House of Representatives has voted to unify animal cruelty laws across the country, which would prohibit the slaughter of dogs and cats for human consumption,” Hastings said. “I am proud to have championed this effort in Congress to explicitly ban the killing and consumption dogs and cats across the United States, and am greatly appreciative of my friend and colleague Congressman Buchanan for taking the ‘Dog and Cat Meat Trade Prohibition Act’ across the finish line today.”

Boy, without the federal government, who could possibly regulate such things? I mean, other than the county commissioners who could just as easily pass an ordinance on the matter? The sale and handling of dog meat is already illegal nearly everywhere in the US. The new federal law is being passed because it gives politicians a shiny object to distract the voters with on the campaign trail this fall.

Keep in mind also, that if the feds plan to enforce the new regulations, it will require work from federal employees who will need to surveil, investigate, and prosecute any suspected lawbreakers. The people who do it will collect a federal salary and, eventually, a federal pension, which the federal workers in questions are likely to spend on sail boats for decades of leisure after retiring at age 55.

Needless to say, there’s no section of the Federal Constitution that expresses the necessity of federal involvement in regulating cat meat. But such trifles don’t concern Congress when there is good politicking to be had. After all, from the politician’s standpoint, only a few odd eccentrics like yours truly are going to bother condemning the bill. Meanwhile, the bill’s supporters will be able to make stump speeches to suburban moms and college activists about how “I am fighting for you” in Congress by making dog-meat boutiques illegal under federal law.

This leads us to ask the question of how widespread this industry even is. If is is not widespread, then why the need for federal legislation? And if it is widespread, then this tells us that somewhere private citizens — presumably taxpayers — like to eat dog meat.

Are we to believe that these people have no rights just because lots of people think dogs are cute? Yes, I get it, I have a dog too and she’s swell. Barring a Venezuela-style apocalypse, I’m totally not ever going to eat her.

On the other hand, if some people somewhere like eating dog, why is it my place to sign off on threatening those people with fines and imprisonment for doing something I find distasteful.

At this point in the debate, of course, the opponents of dog meat will start repeating totally arbitrary reasons for why eating dog ought to be verboten. “They’ cute, they’re intelligent, they make good companions.” And so on.

But as anyone who has worked with pigs knows, those animals are very intelligent. Some are even cute. Some people keep them as pets. And yet, many of the same people who sob over dog meat have few scruples about ordering a sausage pizza. (Cats, of course, are not especially intelligent, nor are they good companions, so it’s hard to see how cat people win any arguments here, even comparing cats to pigs.)

Hardliner animal rights people are, at least, consistent in this. They are against all animal slaughter. And that’s a respectable position — although not one I agree with.1

Indeed, when it comes to leaving alone the people who like to eat whatever-animal-I-think-shouldn’t-be-eaten, all the same arguments apply with cats and dogs and to horses.

[RELATED: “Do We Really Need a Federal Ban on Horse Meat?” by Ryan McMaken]

And unfortunately, the federal government has already been blazing the trail for regulating meat slaughter and sales for quite some time. In fact, it was just late last year that the Congress was debating ending an existing federal ban on the processing of horse meat. And although I’ve been a personal fan of many horses I have met, I also came out against that federal ban.

In that case, though, opponents of horse-meat bans had something more in their favor: Americans were still eating horse meat in the mid twentieth century. Even more recently, Americans were feeding horse meat — ironically, given the current debate — to their cats and dogs. Moreover, as I pointed out in the article, Western society has a long history of eating horse meat, although it was never especially popular in the United States. But in the case of horse meat, why ought the “rights” of horses trump those of private taxpaying citizens who happen to make their living from selling horse meat? Or who enjoy eating it?

With cats and dogs, of course, there is very little history of them being eaten in the US or in Europe.

Eating dogs, however, is apparently common in China, Indonesia, and Korea. Some immigrants from those places still eat dogs. In fact, in high school, I had a Korea-born friend who admitted to eating dog. (Hyun was also absurdly intelligent and a math genius, which may or may not have been related to eating dog meat.)

But, there aren’t enough people in the US who like dog meat to make the pro-dog-meat lobby in the US politically significant. Congress simply doesn’t have to worry about any of those people when campaigning for re-election this November. Those horrible foreigners and new arrivals who like dog meat? To hell with them. And if they get caught eating a dog or cat? Well then its a $5,000 fine. Xenophobia continues to be great politics, just not in the way you think. It’s not the trump voters in this case who are wanting to stick it to foreigners and immigrants. This time, banning dog meat is all about pandering to soccer moms and well-to-do twenty-somethings who refer to their dogs as their children. It’s probably a winning strategy.

  • 1. Unfortunately, with many hardcore animal rights activists, this admirable consistency often fails to extend to opposing the killing of human life pre-birth.

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