Why Tucker Carlson’s Monologue About Syria is So Important

By: Tho Bishop
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Tucker Carlson’s monologue last night was one of the most powerful moments in cable news history. What makes Carlson’s – and Thomas Massie‘s – opposition of bombing Syria so important is that they not only point out that war is not in America’s interest, but openly questioning the “official” narrative about what is going on in that country. Considering he’s been a voice for military restraint since joining Fox’s line up, and proven to be a devastating foil to neocons like Max Boot, Carlson’s stand wasn’t surprising, but it’s still courageous. As Ron Paul and other principled anti-war voices know, nothing outrages the powers at be more than questioning the narrative. 

Compare this strategy to others. Congressman Justin Amash has preferred to make Constitutional arguments against White House military. Unfortunately, as we’ve seen repeatedly in the last 50 years, they don’t work. As Tom Woods has noted, the Constitution has become so badly distorted that the executive branch has completely hijacked war making power. Even the Vietnam-era War Powers Act, seen as a Congressional attempt to limit the executive branch, actually served to strengthen the power of the Oval Office to declare war. 

Similarly, simply questioning the pro’s and con’s of such an action is unlikely to spark the appropriate public outrage. Every day the government pushes us further and further in debt, engaging in all sorts of policies that diminishes our quality of life. With the right spokesmen, a large section of the public will buy into just about anything.

So instead of debating the merits of Syrian action as if both sides have good intentions, an effective anti-war message must call out the warfare state for what it is: a parasitic institution with a long history of lying to the American public in order to use the American flag to bring death and destruction abroad. As Tucker noted, the same advocates for war today were wrong about Syria a year ago. They were wrong about WMDs in Iraq. They wrong about rebuilding Iraq. They were wrong about moderate rebels in Libya and Syria. The foreign policy of the post-9/11 world has been little more than a string of lies, the culmination of which has been millions dead, trillions wasted, America less safe, and the Middle East less stable. 

The brightest silver lining of Donald Trump’s political movement has always been feeding the public’s skepticism of the Federal government – from Congress, to the FBI, to the CIA and the rest of the “Deep State.” Questioning these once sacred institutions has become mainstream orthodoxy for a major political party.

Now that America’s most prominent war skeptic is a Fox News primetime host, perhaps that skepticism will seep into foreign policy as well. 

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