The Trump-Putin-Nixon Water-Tower Coverup Scandal

I know I said I was going to stay a little closer to economics in my commentary and not so much pure politics, but today became so surreal, I couldn’t resist. I couldn’t even make stuff up this rich if I were drinking electric Kool-Aid while mainlining acid!

First, the basic situation: President Trump fires FBI Director James Comey who is hated by Democrats for the bungling manner with which he handled the scandalous Clinton emails that were allegedly obtained and made public by Russia in collusion with Trump. During the campaign, Candidate Trump praised Comey’s breach of every known protocol on how the FBI handles sensitive information, especially politically charged information, and his move outside the chain of command. (Deciding not to prosecute Clinton was never his decision or announcement to make, but rests fully in the attorney general.)

…As Trump flips, the Democrats all flop. The same Democrats who wanted Comey fired and criticized Trump for keeping Comey on as head of the FBI and who recently scoffed at Comey for saying he was only mildly nauseous over the possibility that his actions mighthave changed the election, now rebuke Trump for firing Comey for the very reasons they originally wanted him fired….

As I keep drinking the Kool-Aid, things gets more surreal than you ever thought they could…

This very next morning, as Trump is struggling (and reportedly raging) to distance himself from the accusations of firing Comey to cover up Trump’s own Russian collusion scandal, Trump announces and holds a surprise closed-door meeting with Russia’s Foreign Secretary (counterpart to Secretary of State), Sergey Lavrov, and with Russia’s Ambassador, Sergey Kislyak, and with Putin’s official American friend, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.

Doubling down on that strategy as he seeks to also distance himself from the Democrats’ Nixonian comparisons, Trump invites the press spontaneously into the oval office at which they are surprised to find Trump proudly sitting beside Nixon’s infamous Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, whom some regard as a war criminal during the Watergate-Vietnam-war era….

—David Haggith