China’s Stimulus Is Just Sitting in Cash, Not Being Invested

Photo of Shanghai China street at nightFrom Tyler Durden: China is hoarding cash at the fastest pace since the Lehman Brothers crisis, with companies and investors clearly afraid to put money to work since the Shanghai composite’s meltdown last year.

The last few months have seen trillions of dollars of fresh credit puked into existence in China to enable goal-seeked growth numbers to creep lower (as opposed to utterly collapse). The problem is… the Chinese are hoarding that cash at the fastest pace since Lehman as liquidity concerns flood through the nation.

China’s M2, a broad gauge of money supply including savings deposits, rose at the slowest pace in 15 months and trailed the government’s full-year target of +11% in July. But, as Bloomberg details, by contrast, M1, the total of cash, checks and demand deposits, rose at the quickest pace in six years…

That shows companies “are holding all this cash, but investment returns are low and there are few options for projects,” said Liu Dongliang, a senior analyst at China Merchants Bank Co. in Shenzhen.

In fact, no matter what has been done since the Chinese stock market crashed, the Chinese have been hoarding cash…

In fact, the hoarding of cash in China corresponded with the top in 1999/2000, and the top in 2007…

The iShares FTSE/Xinhua China 25 Index ETF (NYSE:FXI) rose $0.50 (+1.35%) to $37.62 per share in premarket trading Monday. The largest ETF focused on large-cap Chinese equities has gained 5.19% year-to-date.

FXI-2016-08-15

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